Design and Comm' Goodness for Development.

Hi, my name is Julien and I am an agronomist working in the field of Communication for Development. This tumblelog focuses on poverty alleviation, development, environment, social entrepreneurship and other important issues. It is also an attempt to showcase good examples of what can be done in terms of communication to improve development practices.

Feel free to ask me anything or submit a story. You can also subscribe to the RSS feed.

 


Men dig a grave for a 35-year-old mother of five from Somalia. She had arrived at Dadaab camp in Kenya two months earlier, after a 290-km (180-mile) journey from Sakow district, southern Somalia. Her children all survived. (Photo: 2011 © Brendan Bannon)

Men dig a grave for a 35-year-old mother of five from Somalia. She had arrived at Dadaab camp in Kenya two months earlier, after a 290-km (180-mile) journey from Sakow district, southern Somalia. Her children all survived. (Photo: 2011 © Brendan Bannon)


A Kenyan villager waits for her turn to vote at a local polling station in Kosachei in western Kenya on August 4, 2010. Kenyans began voting Wednesday on a proposed constitution that would make their institutions more democratic amid tight security aimed at preventing a repeat of deadly 2007-2008 post-election chaos. Backed by President Mwai Kibaki and Prime Minister Raila Odinga, the ‘yes’ vote has a clear edge in opinion polls despite a feisty ‘no’ campaign which has stigmatised the new text as favouring Muslims, abortion and certain tribes.

A Kenyan villager waits for her turn to vote at a local polling station in Kosachei in western Kenya on August 4, 2010. Kenyans began voting Wednesday on a proposed constitution that would make their institutions more democratic amid tight security aimed at preventing a repeat of deadly 2007-2008 post-election chaos. Backed by President Mwai Kibaki and Prime Minister Raila Odinga, the ‘yes’ vote has a clear edge in opinion polls despite a feisty ‘no’ campaign which has stigmatised the new text as favouring Muslims, abortion and certain tribes.


The Integrated Plastics Recovery and Recycling project is unique as it recycles dirty plastic containers (polythenes) using a novel technique and converts them into plastic poles. No other plastic recycler is known to be able to recycle dirty polythenes (LDPE) that litter the environment without first undergoing a washing process. It is thus a process that minimises resource use.
Plastic waste, collected by community members, is used as the raw material for durable and sustainable plastic poles. The poles are then used as fences or as other construction materials within the building sector, which is the main market.
In doing that, the initiative creates employment and generates community participation for marginalised youth and women in urban Kenya. It also benefits a large number of poor garbage collectors by improving their livelihoods. Over 200,000 ‘green’ jobs will be created in the first year.
Furthermore, the poles made out of recycled dirty polythenes provide an alternative to timber as a building material and thus help to conserve forest which also contributes to mitigating climate change. Besides contributing to protecting the environment, the initiative also reuses non-biodegradable pollutants.

Waste management is one of the first visible issue in developing countries. Lots of people collect plastic bottles where I live (in Laos), and I could easily see such an initiative take off. I heard that 1 kilo of plastic bottles is worth about US$0,12.

The Integrated Plastics Recovery and Recycling project is unique as it recycles dirty plastic containers (polythenes) using a novel technique and converts them into plastic poles. No other plastic recycler is known to be able to recycle dirty polythenes (LDPE) that litter the environment without first undergoing a washing process. It is thus a process that minimises resource use.

Plastic waste, collected by community members, is used as the raw material for durable and sustainable plastic poles. The poles are then used as fences or as other construction materials within the building sector, which is the main market.

In doing that, the initiative creates employment and generates community participation for marginalised youth and women in urban Kenya. It also benefits a large number of poor garbage collectors by improving their livelihoods. Over 200,000 ‘green’ jobs will be created in the first year.

Furthermore, the poles made out of recycled dirty polythenes provide an alternative to timber as a building material and thus help to conserve forest which also contributes to mitigating climate change. Besides contributing to protecting the environment, the initiative also reuses non-biodegradable pollutants.

Waste management is one of the first visible issue in developing countries. Lots of people collect plastic bottles where I live (in Laos), and I could easily see such an initiative take off. I heard that 1 kilo of plastic bottles is worth about US$0,12.


A giraffe felled by drought lies dead on a road in Wajir, Kenya, where virtually no rain has fallen in several years, prompting a severe water crisis.

I saw this picture a couple of weeks ago in Boston Big Picture and it always has a terrible effect on me. It looks so surreal to see this majestic animal lying flat on the ground.

A giraffe felled by drought lies dead on a road in Wajir, Kenya, where virtually no rain has fallen in several years, prompting a severe water crisis.

I saw this picture a couple of weeks ago in Boston Big Picture and it always has a terrible effect on me. It looks so surreal to see this majestic animal lying flat on the ground.